Turning carbon dioxide into stone: Inside Iceland’s innovative push toward sustainability

Turning carbon dioxide into stone: Inside Iceland’s innovative push toward sustainability

The availability of green energy to power artificial lights has also enabled local farmers to extend their growing season and increase production levels. Local farmers currently provide about 43 per cent of domestic consumption of vegetables.

Another example of sustainable innovation Ms Aslaug cited was Iceland’s way of capturing carbon emissions.

“We are taking CO2 (carbon dioxide) from the atmosphere and turning it into stone,” said Ms Aslaug. “So we are carbon capturing in Iceland, and we are starting to scale up that innovation in the next few months or years.”

Iceland, which began its switch to renewable energy in the 1960s, has one of the most ambitious climate targets of achieving carbon neutrality before 2040, said Ms Aslaug.

“Of course, Iceland is very lucky. We have a lot of land and green energy, nearly 100 per cent,” she said. “We see lots of opportunities to do better.”

She said the country, despite being located far away from everywhere else, does feel the impact of the climate crisis.

“In Iceland, we are seeing glaciers melting, (just) like you here in Singapore seeing rising sea levels,” said Ms Aslaug. 

DIVERSIFYING FOOD SOURCES

Ms Aslaug highlighted the opportunities in the agriculture and food production sector, to make it more sustainable and contribute to the circular economy.

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